New Patients
Fillings:
Refrain from eating at least 2 hours and until the anesthesia has worn off. Sensitivity, especially to cold, is common for a time following treatment. For the first few days avoid extremely hot or cold foods and beverages. It is normal to have discomfort in the gums around the tooth after the anesthesia wears off due to the procedure. If your gums are tender, rinse with warm salt water, dissolving 1/2 teaspoon of salt in an 8 oz. glass of warm water. An analgesic such as Tylenol or Advil will help to increase your comfort.

After the placement of your new restoration, it may take a few days to get used to it. If your bite feels unbalanced, please be sure to call our office for an appointment for a simple adjustment.

Although the treatment that was performed is quite durable, the underlying tooth is still vulnerable to decay, especially at the interface between the tooth and filling. It is important to resume regular brushing and flossing immediately. Daily home care and regulating your intake of sugar-containing foods will increase the longevity of your new restoration.

Porcelain Veneers (Laminates):
It is best to refrain from eating for at least 2 hours and until the anesthesia has worn off to prevent possibly injury to your soft tissue.

Temporary: Please be careful when cleaning around the temporary restorations. Do not pull up on the temporary when flossing this area. Make sure to brush this area gently and not to chew any hard foods on the restoration. If your temporary comes off between appointments, please call our office so that we can reapply it for you. Sensitivity to hot and cold is to be expected following treatment. For the first few days, try to avoid extremely hot or cold foods and beverages It is normal to have discomfort in the gums around the tooth after the anesthesia wears off. If you feel discomfort in the gum tissue, rinse the area with warm salt water. You can also take an Advil or Tylenol if the discomfort persists.

Permanent Veneers: When the final restoration is placed, your bite may feel a little different. This is just your mouth adjusting to the new addition. If it still feels off in a few days, please call the office for a slight adjustment. It is important to resume regular brushing and flossing immediately. It is very important to thoroughly clean the area between the veneer and the tooth at the gumline. A consistent daily home care routine will increase the longevity of the restoration.

Crowns and Bridges:
It is best to refrain from eating for at least 2 hours and until the anesthesia has worn off to prevent possibly injury to your soft tissue.

Temporary: Please be careful when cleaning around the temporary restoration. Do not pull up on the temporary when flossing this area. Make sure to brush this area gently and not to chew any hard foods on the restoration. If your temporary comes off between appointments, please call our office so that we can reapply it for you. If it is after hours or during the weekend, you can purchase temporary cement material or denture adhesive at any pharmacy and follow the instructions to reapply your temporary. Sensitivity to hot and cold is to be expected following treatment. For the first few days, try to avoid extremely hot or cold foods and beverages. It is normal to have discomfort in the gums around the tooth after the anesthesia wears off. If you feel discomfort in the gum tissue, rinse the area with warm salt water. You can also take an Advil or Tylenol if the discomfort persists.

Permanent: When the final restoration is placed, your bite may feel a little different. This is just your mouth adjusting to the new addition. If it still feels off in a few days, please call the office for a slight adjustment. It is important to resume regular brushing and flossing immediately. A consistent daily home care routine will increase the longevity of the restoration.

Implants:
Do not disturb the wound. Avoid rinsing, spitting, or touching the wound on the day of surgery. There will be a metal healing abutment protruding through the gingival (gum) tissue. Some bleeding or redness in the saliva is normal for 24 hours. Excessive bleeding (your mouth fills up rapidly with blood) can be controlled by biting on a gauze pad placed directly on the bleeding wound for 30 minutes. If bleeding continues please call for further instructions. Swelling is a normal occurrence after surgery. To minimize swelling, apply an ice bag, or a plastic bag, or towel filled with ice on the cheek in the area of surgery. Apply the ice continuously, as much as possible, for the first 36 hours. Drink plenty of fluids. Avoid hot liquids or food. Soft food and liquids should be eaten on the day of surgery. Return to a normal diet as soon as possible unless otherwise directed.

You should begin taking pain medication as soon as you feel the local anesthetic wearing off. For moderate pain, 1 or 2 Tylenol or Extra Strength Tylenol may be taken every 3-4 hours. Ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) may be taken instead of Tylenol. Ibuprofen, bought over the counter comes in 200 mg tablets: 2-3 tablets may be taken every 3-4 hours as needed for pain. For severe pain, the prescribed medication should be taken as directed. Do not take any of the above medication if you are allergic, or have been instructed by your doctor not to. Be sure to take the prescribed antibiotics as directed to help prevent infection.

Good oral hygiene is essential to good healing. The night of surgery, use the prescribed Peridex Oral Rinse before bed. The day after surgery, the Peridex should be used twice daily, after breakfast and before bed. Be sure to rinse for at least 30 seconds then spit it out. Warm salt water rinses (teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm water) should be used at least 4-5 times a day, as well, especially after meals. Brushing your teeth and the healing abutments is no problem. Be gentle initially with brushing the surgical areas.

Keep physical activities to a minimum immediately following surgery. If you are considering exercise, throbbing or bleeding may occur. If this occurs, you should discontinue exercising. Keep in mind that you are probably not taking normal nourishment. This may weaken you and further limit your ability to exercise.

Dentures and Partials:
Breaking In Period: Most new dentures require a breaking in period before they become comfortable. This length of time varies with each individual patient depending upon their ability, determination, and perseverance to learn how to use them. You must first learn to keep them in place, and then gradually start to use them.

What to expect: It is normal for you to feel awkward at first with your new dentures. Your appearance has probably undergone a slight change, your speech may seem altered, and you feel certain that your mouth is too full. Time, patience, and some training will soon bring about a relaxation of the facial muscles and begin to alleviate some of the apparent problems.

Looseness: If you have had teeth removed immediately prior to placement of the denture, it may feel loose, due mainly to the gum shrinkage that occurs as the gums heal. Complete healing of the gums and the underlying bone takes 3-6 months. During this period a temporary liner may be placed inside the denture to keep it relatively snug. Denture adhesives will also help in this regard. Once healing is complete, a permanent liner will be placed, and simply closing your teeth together and swallowing will help to seat the dentures by removing air and saliva from the interface.

Sore spots: Soreness from uneven pressure on the gums may develop at any time, and is not unusual, especially if you have not worn a denture before. Sore spots are best corrected if the dentures are worn at least 3-6 hours before returning to the office for an adjustment appointment. This can allow a precise detection of the offending areas inside the denture, which are corrected by trimming.

Eating: Start with soft foods or those that are easy to chew. Take small bites and chew slowly, trying to overcome the difficulties as they arise. Keep the food distributed evenly on both sides and chew on the back teeth. To bite foods that normally require the front teeth, such as apples or corn on the cob, apply pressure backward against the front when closing. If the denture begins to dislodge, biting with the side teeth may be an easier alternative. More difficult foods such as steak and carrots will require a gradual learning curve. Initially, it is recommended that you avoid chewing gum or attempt to eat sticky or chewy foods.

Speaking: Learning to talk with your new dentures in place requires some patience and perseverance. Reading aloud is a very good way to learn to enunciate distinctly, especially those sounds or words that are not clear. Try to avoid those movements of the lips and tongue that tend to displace the dentures or cause them to click. Careful practice and repetition may help to hasten the process and produce a return to your normal, confident speech.

outh and Denture Hygiene: It is extremely important to clean your dentures with a soft brush and a cleaning paste, or soapy water, after each meal. Food particles that are trapped under the denture can cause inflammation of the gums and sore spots. You should remove your dentures for at least 6 hours daily, usually when going to bed at night, to give your gum tissues a rest. During this time, the dentures can be cleansed and placed in a small tub of water to prevent them from drying out, which can cause the dentures to distort and not fit well. At least once a week, place them in an enzymatic or special cleaning solution to remove those otherwise insoluble stains and proteins. Because foods will stick to the soft tissues of your mouth, it is also beneficial to brush the roof of your mouth and your tongue daily. Massaging and stimulating these tissues will reduce the incidence of inflammation and sore spots.

If your dentures were placed over new extraction sites (immediate dentures), you may wear the dentures at night for the first 3 days. This will help to promote clotting, and prevent irritations to those sites. You may then resume the directions previously described and remove the dentures when sleeping.

Be sure to have your dentures checked at least once annually as changes in the mouth, such as bone loss, and a wearing of the teeth will inevitably occur. Careful maintenance of the dentures and the supporting soft tissues will help to slow down these changes.

Root Canal:
It is best to refrain from eating for at least 2 hours and until the anesthesia has worn off to prevent possibly injury to your soft tissue. This will also allow the temporary restorative material to harden. You will most likely feel soreness in the area as well as pressure when you bite down. For this reason, you should avoid hard and chewy foods. Do not eat on the treated side of your mouth for at least 24 hours. The soreness should decrease within a week. Take any antibiotic medication prescribed to you by the doctor as this will eliminate any remaining infection in the tooth.

If you notice any of the following symptoms please contact our office:

   - Increasing tenderness or swelling in the area surrounding the tooth
   - A reaction to the medication
   - Loss of the temporary filling material
   - Tooth fracture

White Fillings (Bonding):
It is best to refrain from eating for at least 2 hours and until the anesthesia has worn off to prevent possibly injury to your soft tissue. Sensitivity to hot and cold is to be expected following treatment. For the first few days, try to avoid extremely hot or cold foods and beverages. It is normal to have discomfort in the gums around the tooth after the anesthesia wears off. If you feel discomfort in the gum tissue, rinse the area with warm salt water. You can also take an Advil or Tylenol if the discomfort persists. It is important to resume regular brushing and flossing immediately. A consistent daily home care routine will increase the longevity of the restoration.

Inlays and Onlays:
The cement is already set and the crown, veneer, inlay/onlay or bridge is ready for immediate use. You may experience some minor discomfort for the first few days after your treatment. This should diminish gradually over time. If you have been given an anesthetic, this should subside in a few hours. Please be careful not to bite your cheek or tongue. Also, do not eat or drink anything extremely hot or cold until the anesthetic has completely worn off.

The bite should feel normal when the anesthetic subsides. The bite has been adjusted so your new crown feels natural. If it feels that your bite is still high, contact our Orlando office for an adjustment. If sensitivity to hot, cold or biting pressure persist longer than one week, please call our office for a follow-up evaluation and/or simple adjustment. The tooth will look natural in color, so you may not be able to notice the restoration.

Do not bite anything with your teeth that can damage them (such as finger nails, thread, fishing line, paper clips, pens, etc.). We recommend professional maintenance and evaluation at least twice a year. If you have had a periodontal (gum disease) problem in the past, you should see us a minimum of four times a year. Proper care includes brushing, flossing and rinsing with a mouthwash a minimum of twice daily.

Extractions:
It is normal for minor bleeding to occur for the first 24 hours following surgery If slightly heavier bleeding occurs:

   1. Place a piece of gauze over the surgery site.
   2. Bite firmly on the gauze for at least 30 minutes. DO NOT chew on it.
   3. If the bleeding continues, call the office
   4. Do not suck on area where surgery occurred or drink through a straw during the first 48 hours.

Rinsing:
   1. Do not spit or rinse the surgical area on the day of the surgery..
   2. The day after surgery you may gently rinse with warm salt water.
   3. You may brush your teeth and your tongue after the surgery. Be careful of the surgical site.

Eating:
You should start with liquids and very soft foods for the first 24-48 hours following the surgery. If the area feels a little better, you can then move on to a normal diet. Be careful of chewing on hard foods near the surgical area.

Pain & Swelling:
It is normal to experience some degree of swelling. If you do experience swelling, you can place ice over your face for 20-30 minutes at a time during the first 24 hours. This should help to reduce pain and swelling. Do not ice after the first 36 hours. If you feel discomfort, it is recommended that you take an Advil or Tylenol to ease the pain. If the pain persists, please contact the office.

 

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